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The melting point of aluminum

The melting point is the temperature at which a substance changes from a solid to a liquid. The melting point of a substance also determines how it is treated and used. Aluminum has a melting point of about 1220°F. That’s about twice the melting point of zinc and half that of iron. It is important…

The melting point is the temperature at which a substance changes from a solid to a liquid. The melting point of a substance also determines how it is treated and used. Aluminum has a melting point of about 1220°F. That’s about twice the melting point of zinc and half that of iron. It is important to note that the melting point of aluminum changes with the composition of the alloy, which is very important for aluminum manufacturing.

The manufacture of aluminum

The manufacturing process usually requires the metal to be heated to melting temperatures. Melting, welding and casting all involve melting metal. Aluminium and aluminium alloys can be remelted as needed. The smelting of ingot and billet is the most common, mainly used for subsequent manufacturing, extrusion, drawing, recovery.

Primary aluminum production process

Aluminum is the most abundant metallic element in the earth’s crust and always occurs as a compound. The pure metal must first be chemically refined into alumina and then smelted into aluminium by an electrolytic reduction process.

Alloy compounds affect the melting point of aluminum:

Wood grain aluminum coil
Wood grain aluminum coil

Wood grain aluminum coil

  • 1100:1190-1215 ° F
  • 2024:935 — 1180°F
  • 3003:1190-1210 ° F
  • 5052:1125-1200 ° F
  • 5456:1055-1180 ° F
  • 6061:1080 — 1205°F
  • 7075:890-1175 ° F

Chemical impurities

Common aluminum and its alloys contain some impurities. Impurities can be understood as unwanted chemical elements. Chemical impurities can change the melting point. If the melting point changes more than 41 degrees Fahrenheit, the presence of impurities is demonstrated.

Impurities may appear at any time throughout the smelting process. Burden contamination or cosolvent interaction, element dissolution of casting and melting equipment and tools. These produce impurities.

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